"The Gift of the Magi"
by O. Henry

  Previous Page   Next Page   Speaker Off

     So now Della's beautiful hair fell about her rippling and shining like a cascade of brown waters. It reached below her knee and made itself almost a garment for her. And then she did it up again nervously and quickly. Once she faltered for a minute and stood still while a tear or two splashed on the worn red carpet.

     On went her old brown jacket; on went her old brown hat. With a whirl of skirts and with the brilliant sparkle still in her eyes, she fluttered out the door and down the stairs to the street.

     Where she stopped the sign read: "Mne. Sofronie. Hair Goods of All Kinds." One flight up Della ran, and collected herself, panting. Madame, large, too white, chilly, hardly looked the "Sofronie."


     "Will you buy my hair?" asked Della.

     "I buy hair," said Madame. "Take yer hat off and let's have a sight at the looks of it."

     Down rippled the brown cascade.

     "Twenty dollars," said Madame, lifting the mass with a practised hand.

     "Give it to me quick," said Della.

     Oh, and the next two hours tripped by on rosy wings. Forget the hashed metaphor. She was ransacking the stores for Jim's present.

Text provided by Project Gutenberg.
Audio by LiteralSystems, performed by Jane Aker, and funded in part by Hogle's Theatrical Supplies.
Flash mp3 player by Jeroen Wijering. (cc) some rights reserved.
Web page presentation by LoudLit.org.